Lunada Bay Tile Takes Flight with Birdscape

Dale Chihuly, Louis Comfort Tiffany, Rene Lalique: these famous artists pushed the boundaries of glass design, bringing art glass to the forefront of popular culture.

Lunada Bay Tile has expanded upon its passion for the breathtaking beauty of art glass with Birdscape. This collection of handmade glass birds draws on a fusion of glassmaking traditions to create one-of-a-kind works of art. Each of these delicate avian creatures is lovingly crafted using the lost wax technique, which entails the use of a hand-carved wax mold, plaster, and molten glass. Beautifully carved details in the feathers, wings, and tails make each bird a unique treasure.

Birdscape-Styles (1)“The Birdscape collection embodies the relationship between museum-quality art glass and Lunada Bay Tile glass mosaics,” said President and CEO of Lunada Bay Tile, Carl Steadly, an avid collector of art glass who expresses his artistic vision through the creation of glass mosaic tile.

Since 1992, Lunada Bay Tile has produced handcrafted glass tile collections through old and new techniques of glass making that elevate design possibilities and create statements using color, shape, texture and luminosity. Each new tile collection strives to connect people to the aspirational space of their imagination.

“Glass is a versatile medium, and we are very excited about being part of this new movement where glass is growing as the choice for artistic expression,” Steadly said. “The delicate, expressive creatures of Birdscape are a cross pollination of perspectives, making it possible for glass mosaics to become part of a larger conversation about personal expression.”

Create your own narrative by displaying these glass birds individually or in an installation that emulates a flock of birds in flight. The Birdscape collection is available in three styles and six colors.
Bird Cage 5

Modern Barkitecture

Dog House 4.jpgOne of the best things we can do as animal lovers is to provide safe environments for our pets. Lunada Bay Tile teamed up with Tile Council of North America and an Atlanta pet charity at Coverings – The Global Tile & Stone Experience where exhibitors are donating one-of-a-kind tiled doghouses.

For this year’s modern dog house, Lunada Bay Tile intended to provide Instagram-worthy style and shelter from the midday sun. The roof and side walls showcase the striking architectural shapes of Ka-nū Keel ceramic tile in Harbor Blue, which feature a lustrous, subtly pearlized glaze. The front and back walls are a combination of Ka-nū Buoy Mosaic in Sandbar, Harbor Blue, and Sea Kelp, and the house is trimmed in Ka-nū Plank 1-3/4 x 9-3/4 in Sea Kelp. It was fun to design this project with Ka-nū, which will be available through authorized Lunada Bay Tile dealers later this year.

The Lunada Bay Tile doghouse will join others donated by fellow TCNA members and will be on display during Coverings in the TCNA Art Tile Courtyard (booth #7249). Following the show, all doghouses will be donated to the Homeless Pets Foundation, a 501(c)3 organization that saves the lives of homeless cats and dogs in Atlanta area animal shelters and promotes the benefits of pet ownership.

See all that Lunada Bay Tile has to offer at Coverings booth 8062, May 8-11 in Atlanta.

Great Project Photography: Checklist for Success

In the blog series Great Project Photography, we will offer designers a variety of tips on why and how to capture professional photography for your tile design projects. 

Capturing good photos of your tile projects takes some forethought, organization and planning. Houzz recently surveyed some of the online platform’s most successful pros to learn their tried and true strategies for success.

Ready to get started? Here’s a checklist to get your photography off to the right start:

Communicating with Clients

  • Discuss the photoshoot early
    Tell your clients you want to take professional photos of the finished project at the very first meeting to set client expectations properly.
  • Put it in the contract
    Adding a release to your contract will give you the right to photograph your work. This formal agreement is one way to make sure all parties are on the same page.
  • Send a reminder
    As work begins to wrap up, remind your client that you’re excited about the upcoming photoshoot and discuss potential timeframes for the photographer to come by.

Hiring a photographer

  • Find a photographer
    People hire you because you’re an expert at what you do; the same is true for professional photographers.
  • Look at their portfolio
    Once you’ve assembled a list of potential photographers, look through their portfolio or projects. Do you like their style? Can they capture your work the way you want them to?
  • Discuss working styles
    Take your top prospects and call them to see how they work. Are they interested in outside input? Do they understand your goals? Will they work with your needs?

Shooting the Project

  • Discuss your goals
    Before the shoot, communicate your goals to your photographer so they know how you want your work to be captured. Be sure to specify any design details you want highlighted.
  • Time it right
    The best time to shoot is right after the project is completed. The space will be in pristine condition and the homeowners won’t be quite moved in yet, so it won’t be inconvenient to stage or shoot.
  • Stage the scene
    Whether you work with professional stagers or not, make sure your projects look consistent, beautiful and professional. If your space is looking sparse, use props like a bowl of lemons, bottles of sparkling water or flowers to add some character. Using a consistent palette for your props will keep the photos looking uncluttered and places the focus on your tile design work.

 

What region has the largest kitchens?

 

Are your Thanksgiving ambitions larger than the size of your kitchen? You might not be alone.

The average size of a kitchen in newly-built single family homes is 161 square feet, just under 13 feet by 13 feet, according to new research from the National Kitchen & Bath Association (NKBA). The research also found that the size of American kitchens vary by geographic location, house size and the number of stories in a home.
See More! →